Replacing web server functionality with serverless services

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Web servers bring together many useful services in traditional web development. Developers use servers like Apache and NGINX for many common tasks. Linux, Apache, MySQL, and PHP formed the LAMP stack to power a large percentage of the world’s websites. Other variants, like the MEAN stack (MongoDB, Express.js, AngularJS, Node.js), have also been popular. By James Beswick.

In the migration to serverless, it’s important to understand where this functionality moves to. There are significant benefits in taking a serverless approach to developing web apps but there are differences in where developers spend their efforts. This blog post provides a guide to serverless development for traditional web developers to help with this transition.

To run a “Hello World” example in a highly available configuration, using a traditional webserver approach you need more than one server in more than one Availability Zone. This server contains an operating system, runtime, and web server software, together with your code. You might build an Amazon Machine Image (AMI) to help with creating more servers. The guide then deals with:

  • Comparing a “Hello World” example
  • Implementing authentication in serverless web apps
  • Generating HTML, CSS and front-end templates
  • Uploading, processing, and saving binary files
  • Storing application state

Application state: For functions that need a durable store of user data that can be rehydrated between invocations, Amazon DynamoDB tables provide a low-latency, cost-effective solution. For example, this is ideal for recalling shopping cart contents or user profiles. Great guide!

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Tags app-development infosec aws serverless lambda